Resolution of epileptic symptoms in child

February 22, 2011 by
Filed under: Research, Spinewave Bulletin 

Upper Cervical Care in a Nine-Year-Old Female With Occipital Lobe Epilepsy: A Case Study

Objective: The reduction of an upper cervical subluxation through chiropractic care in the case of a child with occipital lobe epilepsy is described.

Clinical Features: A nine-year-old girl presented with uncontrollable blinking of the left eye and fainting spells, previously diagnosed by a neurologist as occipital lobe epilepsy.

Intervention and Outcomes: High velocity and light force adjustments (Blair technique) were applied to the first cervical vertebra on three separate occasions. Other low force adjustments (Activator) were administered to various levels of the spinal column where vertebral subluxations existed. The patient’s uncontrolled eye twitching decreased immediately following the first upper cervical adjustment and ceased completely 3 weeks following the final adjustment. The twitching has not resurfaced in approximately 2 years.

Conclusions: This case report demonstrated resolution of signs and symptoms associated with occipital lobe epilepsy in a child following the reduction of an upper cervical subluxation.

Reference:

Hooper, S. et al., Upper Cervical Care in a Nine-Year-Old Female With Occipital Lobe Epilepsy: A Case Study. Journal of Upper Cervical Chiropractic Research. Pages 10-17. 2011.

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