Five exercises to help avoid back pain from sitting

April 6, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Spinewave Bulletin 

At this point, everyone knows sitting all day isn’t good for your health. But all kinds of jobs still require people to sit for prolonged periods of time.

You don’t have to put up with stiffness and back pain from sitting. Over time that pain can affect your ability to run, play sports, and exercise and negatively impact your health.

Glute Bridges

Lay down on your back with your knees bent and your feet on the floor. Next raise your butt and hips so that your body forms a straight line. Then lower yourself back down. That’s one rep. You should try to do three sets of ten. If that’s too easy, you can add a weight and hold it on your thighs while you do the reps. This exercise is great for your hips and glutes, and as an added bonus, your abs!

Couch Stretch

Place one leg on the floor, and the other on the couch, so that your knee is touching the back. Then flex your abs and butt and slowly raise your torso up so that you are standing tall. Hold that position for about 1 minute and then switch legs.

To push it to the next level, you can bring your foot on the floor up to the seat of the couch and try to raise your torso to a neutral position again. This will be tough at first, but can potentially undo years of sitting.

Grok Squat

This involves getting into a squatting position with your feet on the floor, your back straight, and your butt about as low as it will go. Think baseball catcher position. You should feel the stretch through your legs, back, and groin.

Leg Swings

It involves holding something for balance and then swinging your leg back and forth as high as it will go. You can start by going front-to-back with each leg, and then side-to-side. Try 20 swings of each kind.

 Fire Hydrants

To do the exercise, get on all fours and raise your leg out to the side as high as you can while keeping it bent. Then lower it down. That’s one rep. You should feel your hips and butt working.

Of course, the best exercise is to walk around every half hour or so, but that’s not always possible. So if you find yourself sitting for hours on end, try to do some, or all, of these exercises a few times a week.

Statins stimulate atherosclerosis and heart failure

November 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Research, Spinewave Bulletin 

statin

“In contrast to the current belief that cholesterol reduction with statins decreases atherosclerosis, we present a perspective that statins may be causative in coronary artery calcification and can function as mitochondrial toxins that impair muscle function in the heart and blood vessels through the depletion of coenzyme Q10 and ‘heme A’, and thereby ATP generation.

Statins inhibit the synthesis of vitamin K2, the cofactor for matrix Gla-protein activation, which in turn protects arteries from calcification. Statins inhibit the biosynthesis of selenium containing proteins, one of which is glutathione peroxidase serving to suppress peroxidative stress.

An impairment of selenoprotein biosynthesis may be a factor in congestive heart failure, reminiscent of the dilated cardiomyopathies seen with selenium deficiency. Thus, the epidemic of heart failure and atherosclerosis that plagues the modern world may paradoxically be aggravated by the pervasive use of statin drugs.

We propose that current statin treatment guidelines be critically reevaluated.”

Reference:

Okuyama, H., et al., Statins stimulate atherosclerosis and heart failure: pharmacological mechanisms. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol, 2015. 8 (2): p. 189-99

Teen dies of stroke after love bite

August 30, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Spinewave Bulletin 

Love bite stroke hickeyA teenager has died after a love bite from his girlfriend caused a blood clot that quickly led to a stroke.

Julio Macias Gonzalez, a 17-year-old from Mexico City, raised alarm among his family when he began convulsing at the dinner table.

It is thought his girlfriend gave him a hickey earlier that evening which caused a blood clot that travelled to the teen’s brain. Paramedics were called to the scene but Julio could not be saved and died shortly after.

The young man’s family are blaming his 24-year-old girlfriend for his death but she has now disappeared.

It is not the first time a love bite has been believed to have triggered a reaction. In 2011 a 44-year-old woman in New Zealand lost movement in her left arm after having a stroke.

On noticing a faded love bite, doctors quickly realised damage to a major artery in her neck and linked it to her paralysis. The suction had caused a blood clot to form which then travelled to the woman’s heart, causing a stroke.

Dr Teddy Wu, who treated the woman at Auckland’s Middlemore Hospital, said: “To my knowledge, it’s the first time someone has been hospitalised by a hickey.”

Love bites or hickeys are caused by a person sucking on an area of another person’s skin, more commonly the neck. The suction causes blood vessels under the skin to burst which causes bruising that can last up to two weeks.

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